Water to wine - a vision becoming a reality


I have been on a rant about vision lately. Many people have ask me: How do I get vision? What does it take to make it a reality? and How do I sustain it? Last week I answered the first question in my post titled Where Does Vision Come From?. Now, I want to ask you 3 questions. If you can answer them correctly, it will help you turn your dream into a reality.

 

1. Are you willing to pay for it?

To say the cost for vision is a premium would be a gross understatement. If people could exchanged currency for its true value, it would be hard to say that any could afford it. I can’t tell you the price of vision, but I can tell you what you will have to pay for it. You will pay in countless sleepless nights, complete mental and physical exhaustion, precious time and money you might, or might not, get reimbursed for. These expenses will be on you, no one is going to pick up the tab to fund your vision; if you want it, you will have to pay.

 

2. Are you willing to suffer for it?

After your vision has bankrupt you, will you still think it is worth it? If the answer is yes, then you must now ask yourself if you are determined to stand by your vision, even when everything else is falling apart. Paying a high price for something that may only have value to you is difficult on its own, but now you have to crank up the heat. The winds will howl, the ground will shake, and the flood waters will rise, this I can guarantee. This storm is where visions die and this storm will be on a direct path to you. The added everyday pressures coupled with specific resistance will leave you with two options. Will you let your vision be lost to the riptide, or will you suffer through it and fight to keep it from drowning?

 

3. Are you willing to risk your reputation for it?

What happens once you have paid the highest price and suffered through the greatest opposition? Do you get to win the battle? I will argue that you are not out of the rain yet. Before victory, you must be willing to sacrifice even more. “But what more is there? I am beat up, broke and out of breath; simply, I have nothing left to give!” You would be almost right to say this, but there is still one thing left that your vision might ask you for. When you pay and when you suffer, the world may just decide to reject you. Those closest to you: family, friends, even colleagues who were once seemingly on board in the beginning, may disregard you as nothing but a lost cause. Can you face rejection, stare humiliation straight in the eyes and not back down? Vision has lost the reputation of scientists, explorers, geniuses, artists, writers, and so many more who were already passed before the world chose to bestow praises and graces back to their names.

What if your vision is only realized by the masses once you are gone? Will it still be worth it to you?